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The Facts

  • Diet of Conflict

    South Sudan is one of the worlds’ poorest countries. Devastated by decades of war, the country lacks even basic infrastructure.

    60-75% of the people are living on less than one US dollar a day. 

    Only 27% have access to clean drinking water. Only 15% to safe sanitation.

  • Death Rates of Infants

    Poor sanitation and hygiene kills young babies. 

    The infant mortality rate in South Sudan is 75 per 1,000 births, ranked in the world’s worst 10%.

  • Early Marriage Steals Childhood

    Despite the legal age for marriage in South Sudan being 18, close to half of South Sudanese girls between 15 and 19 are married, with some marrying as young as 12.

  • Sexual assault against young girls

    Worldwide, nearly 50% of all sexual assaults are against girls under 15 years old. Sexual and gender-based violence has long existed in many African (and other) countries, and rape within marriage is not deemed illegal.

  • Teenage Childbirth Kills Both Mothers and Babies

    More women die in childbirth, per capita, in South Sudan, than in any country in the world.

    Girls between the ages of 10 and 14 are five times more likely to die in pregnancy or childbirth than women aged 20 to 24.

    The baby of a mother under 18 has a 60% greater risk of dying in its first year than the baby of a mother over 19.

  • Illiteracy and Lack of Education

    Decades of civil war have robbed a whole generation of their education. Over 90% of adult women (and 80% of men) are illiterate. According to UNICEF 64% (around 1 million) of children between the ages of 6 and 11 are not in school. 

    Only 1 in 6 of the teachers is trained and few schools have roofs, let alone desks and books. Opportunities for girls are particularly poor, and less than one in five girls grow up being able to read or write.

Diet of Conflict

South Sudan is one of the worlds’ poorest countries. Devastated by decades of war, the country lacks even basic infrastructure.

60-75% of the people are living on less than one US dollar a day. 

Only 27% have access to clean drinking water. Only 15% to safe sanitation.

Death Rates of Infants

Poor sanitation and hygiene kills young babies. 

The infant mortality rate in South Sudan is 75 per 1,000 births, ranked in the world’s worst 10%.

Early Marriage Steals Childhood

Despite the legal age for marriage in South Sudan being 18, close to half of South Sudanese girls between 15 and 19 are married, with some marrying as young as 12.

Sexual assault against young girls

Worldwide, nearly 50% of all sexual assaults are against girls under 15 years old. Sexual and gender-based violence has long existed in many African (and other) countries, and rape within marriage is not deemed illegal.

Teenage Childbirth Kills Both Mothers and Babies

More women die in childbirth, per capita, in South Sudan, than in any country in the world.

Girls between the ages of 10 and 14 are five times more likely to die in pregnancy or childbirth than women aged 20 to 24.

The baby of a mother under 18 has a 60% greater risk of dying in its first year than the baby of a mother over 19.

Illiteracy and Lack of Education

Decades of civil war have robbed a whole generation of their education. Over 90% of adult women (and 80% of men) are illiterate. According to UNICEF 64% (around 1 million) of children between the ages of 6 and 11 are not in school. 

Only 1 in 6 of the teachers is trained and few schools have roofs, let alone desks and books. Opportunities for girls are particularly poor, and less than one in five girls grow up being able to read or write.

South Sudan

Key Fact Sheets (PDF)

South Sudan, a mainly African and Christian country, has only recently emerged from over 25 years of war with north Sudan, a mainly Muslim, Arabic country. At least 1.5 million people are thought to have lost their lives in the fighting.

A peace agreement was signed in 2005, which resulted in South Sudan becoming an independent nation on 9th July 2011, but it is still volatile within its own recently created boundaries.

South Sudan is one of Africa’s least developed countries, but the newest nation in the world has benefitted from international aid since 2005, and stands to benefit from inheriting the bulk of Sudan's oil wealth.

The peace dividend, however is hindered by continuing border disputes, rivalries within the governing party, a lack of physical infrastructure and limited economic development. Over-dependence upon oil revenues (80% of GDP) clouds the immediate future, but long term prospects probably lie in diversifying the economy towards development of agriculture and forestry.

Key Fact Sheets (PDF)

Solutions

  • Educate to Elevate

    Educating a woman not only elevates her, but also uplifts her children, community and country. Women are more likely to pass on their knowledge to others within their family and community. “Women’s empowerment helps raise economic productivity and reduce infant mortality. It contributes to improved health and nutrition. It increases the chances of education for the next generation” -UN Development Programme

  • Educate for peace

    Education can change the fabric of society, promoting a more peaceful and productive way of life. “Educate a Girl; Heal a Nation”

  • Educate for economic empowerment

    “Investment in girls’ education may well be the highest-return investment available in the developing world. The question is not whether countries can afford this investment, but whether countries can afford not to educate girls” Lawrence Summers, whilst chief economist at the World Bank

  • Educate to protect

    Girls who stay in school have a later sexual debut, are less likely to be subjected to forced sex, and if sexually active are more likely to understand how to use contraception

  • Educate for personal and community development

    Education can help South Sudan girls to contribute as transformed and empowered women, to the development of their communities and to the leadership of this new nation.

Educate to Elevate

Educating a woman not only elevates her, but also uplifts her children, community and country. Women are more likely to pass on their knowledge to others within their family and community. “Women’s empowerment helps raise economic productivity and reduce infant mortality. It contributes to improved health and nutrition. It increases the chances of education for the next generation” -UN Development Programme

Educate for peace

Education can change the fabric of society, promoting a more peaceful and productive way of life. “Educate a Girl; Heal a Nation”

Educate for economic empowerment

“Investment in girls’ education may well be the highest-return investment available in the developing world. The question is not whether countries can afford this investment, but whether countries can afford not to educate girls” Lawrence Summers, whilst chief economist at the World Bank

Educate to protect

Girls who stay in school have a later sexual debut, are less likely to be subjected to forced sex, and if sexually active are more likely to understand how to use contraception

Educate for personal and community development

Education can help South Sudan girls to contribute as transformed and empowered women, to the development of their communities and to the leadership of this new nation.

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